Why Men are Fascinated with a Female Bodybuilder’s Genitalia (NSFW)

WARNING: This post, unlike most posts on this website, contains images that are definitely not safe the work. Unless, of course, you work at a place that allows you to view pictures of gorgeous nude female bodybuilders. If this is the case, you need to let me know if there are any job openings at your place of employment as soon as possible.

One aspect to having a female muscle fetish that might seem really bizarre at first but sort of makes sense once you think about is this:

We are fascinated with a muscular woman’s genitalia.

<Insert dramatic pause>

Whoa there! What??? Is this a real thing?

Yes, it is. It’s a very real thing. Let me explain in further detail.

There are a few female bodybuilders who are especially famous for what exists between her legs. Denise Masino is probably the best example of this. Some Internet users have described Miss Masino as having a “Reuben sandwich” or a “pastrami sandwich” between her thighs. One might describe her vulva as looking like “roast beef.” The analogies may be crude (and unintentionally hilarious), but they aren’t far off from the mark.

Other FBBs are also famous for their genitals. Angela Salvagno is a very well-endowed woman. Amber DeLuca is also very beautiful down there. Yvette Bova is not afraid to show off her lady parts for a leering camera (and for good reason!). But when you ask any fan of female bodybuilding who has the most memorable package, Queen Denise immediately comes to mind.

So what’s all the interest about? First of all, there is interest. Just do a simple Google search (preferably when you’re NOT at work!) of “female bodybuilder clit” or “female muscle pussy” and see what you get. There are many websites and blogs dedicated to showcasing the genitals of FBBs. Female bodybuilding aficionados may not want to openly admit it, but looking at an FBB’s clit, vulva, labia and vagina is often a big turn-on.

The reason for this interest is an intriguing topic of discussion. Let’s break it down:

1. The differences between boys and girls

Growing up, most kids know the most basic differences between boys and girls. Boys have a penis, girls have a vagina. Pretty simple, huh? As a former child myself, I can testify to the existence of many conversations with my friends on the playground where questions like this arose:

“What does a girl’s pussy look like?”

“Have you ever seen a pussy before?”

“Do this with your hands…”

The latter should be very familiar to most of you. Remember back in the day when someone told you to put your hands together, part your pointer finger and middle finger, and interconnect it with someone who’s doing the exact same thing? Yeah, supposedly it looks like a girl’s vagina when you move the palms of your hands outward.

Does it really? No, not really. But when you’re 10 years old, you’ll believe anything you’re told.

Of course, back then none of us ever heard of the word “vagina,” so we stuck to calling it a “pussy.” Rumor has it some adults continue to use this vernacular. Whatever. The point being is that growing up, we were all very curious about what exists between our legs and how not everyone looks the same down there. Some boys are circumcised. Others are not. Do Asian girls and white girls have different looking pussies? God only knows…

Meet Denise Masino, who lays claim to one of the most famous set of genitalia among FBBs.
Meet Denise Masino, who lays claim to one of the most famous set of genitalia among FBBs.

So when these boys and girls grow up to become men and women, doesn’t it figure that this fascination would continue? We’re captivated by what we don’t know. Of course, there’s a base sexual interest in the genitalia of someone you’re attracted to, but that’s just part of the equation. This merely explains the origins of our interest in the genitalia of the opposite sex.

2. A female bodybuilder comes close to becoming a “man” without actually being one

Scientifically speaking, increased testosterone levels in female bodybuilders is the reason why their clitorises increase in size.

Known as “clitoromegaly,” it is defined as an abnormal enlargement of the clitoris that is either congenital (happens at birth) or acquired through the use of anabolic steroids (including testosterone). Clitoromegaly does not include the enlargement of the clitoris during sexual arousal.

During the embryo’s development, the genital tubercle formulates at around week 4 of gestation. This phallic outgrowth is gender-neutral (because the embryo has not established a gender yet), meaning it is neither a penis nor a clitoris. Its undifferentiated status changes during week 13. The sex organs become fully developed by week 16.

All of this boils down to the fact that the penis and the clitoris are homologous. Or in other words, biologically similar and related. Perhaps another way to look at this is to think of the penis and the clitoris as being “brother and sister” to one another.

Obviously, the male’s penis is much larger in size than the female’s clitoris. No amount of shrinkage in a blistering cold swimming pool will change that. But the concept that they’re structurally parallel remains the same.

The Italian Muscle Goddess Angela Salvagno.
The Italian Muscle Goddess Angela Salvagno.

Both provide the possessor of the organ sexual pleasure through orgasm. Both increase in size during sexual arousal. The clitoris’s sole purpose is to give the woman pleasure. The penis obviously, in addition to that, has two other functions – reproduction and urinating.

Didn’t think you’d get a Human Anatomy 101 lesson, did you?

But for male fans of female bodybuilders, the intrigue caused by an FBB’s unnaturally enlarged clitoris can be explained by the fact that this brings her very close to becoming a “man” without her actually becoming a man. Men who are fascinated with big clits don’t like them because they resemble a penis. Their fascination is rooted in the idea that this nearly gives her “male status” without giving her any of the power.

Obviously, having large muscles is mostly associated with maleness. Women are not commonly seen as possessing big strength as part of her natural genetic makeup. So anytime someone crosses that threshold, society tends to react negatively.

An enlarged “penis-like” clitoris is another (though much more hidden) facet of a female bodybuilder’s physical appearance that also crosses a taboo border. Outside of college campuses and gender studies enthusiasts, most of us in the world’s population believe there is a very definitive line between men and women. Culturally, yes, but especially biologically. So anytime we come across a person who messes with that paradigm, a number of different reactions can result.

Some are disgusted. Others are confused. Many are indifferent. But a small number are curious. And that curiosity can lead to embracing that person’s uniqueness. Men who love female muscle clearly embrace that uniqueness.

For many FBB-loving men out there, they find it exciting that a female bodybuilder can work very hard to achieve a physique that nearly encroaches on their male power, but can never ever come close to violating that. No matter how hard she tries, an FBB will always be a woman, unless she attempts gender reconstruction. A large clitoris is another reminder of that. The penis gives the man power (the power to give pleasure and the power to present his seed for reproduction). A large clitoris may somewhat resemble a penis, but it doesn’t give her a single ounce of his power. She’s still a female and he’s still a male, despite the fact she can deadlift more than him.

We can maintain our John Wayne-style machismo despite an FBB being physically stronger than us in every conceivable way. We’re Men with a capital “M.” You may be big, strong, and possess a clitoris that makes male porn actors blush, but you can never encroach upon our “maleness” no matter how hard you try. This attitude isn’t explained by misogyny (though I could be wrong), but instead pride in being who you are.

Skirting this fine line is very interesting to think about. The big question really comes down to: What makes a man a man and what makes a woman a woman?

Without getting into too much detail, clitoromegaly does not make a woman become a man, despite what you might hear on the Internet. She’s still a woman, though a very nontraditional looking woman. And even a weak man who can’t hold a candle up to an FBB in terms of strength can take solace in the fact that his penis (regardless of its size) will always make him a man.

3. Power play, power dynamics and sharing the love

This conveniently transitions into the third point, which is all about power. This point sort of contradicts the previous point, but the fascination with large clits has plenty of layers to it, even some that seem at odds.

Traditionally, the male penis has been associated with power. His ability to sexually satisfy a woman with his penis is his form of “taming” her or “claiming her as his property.” His penis is also the source of his seed, which creates life. She bears life, but he begins it. These notions might be outdated, but you cannot deny these motifs still exist to a certain extent.

In the previous point, we discussed how some men love the fact that FBBs are women who resemble men but remain women, which allows men to maintain their “maleness” without the fear of emasculation. On the other hand, some men love the fact that FBBs are amazing enough to cross that sacred threshold and embrace a level of gender ambiguity that totally turns the tables on everyone.

For some guys, an FBB with a big clit is her way of sharing his “maleness” and his male power but in her own special way. Her clit isn’t equal to his penis, but as far as power goes, they might as well be allied. Speaking for myself, I love FBBs with large clits because it gives her a heightened sense of sexual power. Not because her clit can penetrate anyone on a practical level, but because it gives her an element of sexual dominance that she doesn’t traditionally wield.

The very sexy Amber DeLuca.
The very sexy Amber DeLuca.

A vagina can be seen as being a subordinate body part. Its purpose is to be penetrated by a man for the reception of his seed. It serves a passive role. Many women today reject that notion and believe their vaginas are in fact active parts of their sex life. A large clit is one way of tearing down that paradigm. A large clit is an active avenue for a woman to be sexual. Whether she pleases herself through clitoral masturbation or enjoys her partner (male or female) stimulating her clit for her, her body becomes an active beneficiary of pleasure, not a recipient of enjoyment “by default.”

A woman with a large clit shares power with her male counterparts. She becomes a sensual creature who has the right to self-indulgence. It is this sense of sexual sovereignty that explains why lots of men love female bodybuilders. It’s not necessarily because FBBs are more sexual than “normal” women, it’s because we fantasize that they are. And of course, fantasy can be so much more exciting than reality.

4. We are intrigued by what is different

Sometimes, Occam’s Razor is the simplest explanation (see what I did there?). We are fascinated by what is different. A big clit is abnormal. Therefore, we are interested by it because of that.

Well, that was easy.

But seriously, as if men weren’t already turned on by a woman’s genitalia, larger-than-life genitalia should be considered a bonus. It mesmerizes us on a primal level. There’s something very titillating by the prospects of a woman possessing the strength, sexual prowess and social power of a man while still preserving her femininity. We’re turned on by her because she’s a gorgeous woman; but her muscles, large frame, enlarged genitals and masculine sounding voice (which is not always the case) gives her a special status that is almost impossible to put into words.

Is it female/male? Fe/male? Masculine feminine?

Perhaps a more accurate description is that she’s a “female plus.” Still a woman, not a man, but definitely possessing characteristics that heighten her femininity. While these characteristics may come across as being conventionally “masculine,” being masculine unto itself doesn’t mean you’re a man. It means you exhibit behaviors and physical traits customarily associated with men. A woman can take on these qualities and still retain her womanhood. Nothing has changed. We’re just shifting the way we view how men and women “should” look and behave.

Fall is here, so it must be time for Autumn Raby.
Fall is here, so it must be time for Autumn Raby.

It really is difficult to articulate why so many men love strong muscular women. Her genitalia is part of the equation, but not the entire explanation. There’s something about bending that fine gender line that brings out the passionate frenzy in us. We love our ladies, just a different kind of lady. Nothing wrong with that.

We acknowledge the existence of the traditional male/female binary (for better or for worse), but we aren’t afraid to go against the grain every once in a while. We love female bodybuilders because they’re women, but we certainly see resemblances of us in them. Deep down inside, we may not be that much different.

This is why men are fascinated with a female bodybuilder’s genitalia. Part of it is cultural. Lots of it is sexual. But a tiny part of it is intuitive. We don’t know why, we can’t explain why, but we just can’t get enough of Denise Masino’s beautiful and hypnotic pastrami sandwich.

I’ll take that on rye, please!

The “Alternate Femininity” of Female Bodybuilders

A striking pose by Karen Garrett.
A striking pose by Karen Garrett.

The unfair stereotypes associated with female bodybuilders are both too numerous to list and cringe-worthy when heard aloud.

“Female bodybuilders are gross because they don’t look like women!”

“Female bodybuilders are disgusting because they secretly want to be men!”

“Female bodybuilders are unappealing because women aren’t supposed to be that muscular!”

“Female bodybuilders aren’t real women because…well, isn’t it obvious?”

How many times have you heard opinions like these? Maybe not word-for-word, but generally speaking does any of this sound familiar? In all likelihood, fans of female bodybuilders and female bodybuilders themselves have probably come across vitriol like this way too often.

In an attempt to shatter some of these negative stereotypes, let’s discuss a concept that a student of gender/sexuality studies should be well versed in: gender as a social construct.

The theory goes that the idea we’ve come to know as “gender” is an arbitrary set of rules, roles and beliefs that is artificially created by culture rather than inherent biology. The differences between men and women are considered “differences” because “we say it’s so.” While certain physiological characteristics separate the male and female sexes (genitalia, hormone levels, reproductive system, etc.), other factors like behavior, intellectual abilities and hierarchal positions in society are nothing more than just a product of the paradigms we’ve created over time.

If we assume this theory to have at least a certain degree of validity, this somewhat debunks the above mentioned stereotypes as, simply put, a bunch of hogwash.

Of course female bodybuilders are real women! They aren’t men. Men are men and women are women. A woman with muscles is still a woman, despite how (admittedly) unusual it is. Who says women aren’t supposed to be that muscular? Just because we don’t see that sort of thing every day doesn’t mean it shouldn’t happen.

The idea that female bodybuilders aren’t “feminine” plays into traditional gender roles that most human societies have adapted to a point. Yes, it’s true there are certain cultures out there where women are more of the “hunters” than the “gatherers,” but these types of societies are far and few between. For the sake of debate, let’s just assume that the “men are the stronger sex, women are the weaker sex” dichotomy is universally agreed upon.

Famke Janssen might be the most gorgeous woman on the planet.
Famke Janssen might be the most gorgeous woman on the planet.

It should be mentioned that “femininity” can have a fluid definition. Is “feminine” simply defined as any characteristics that a woman displays, or does there have to be a certain level of “social agreement” on these characteristics? For example, even though weightlifting is traditionally regarded as a male pastime, if more women took up the hobby, over time wouldn’t we start to associate the activity as more “gender neutral?”

Smoking was once seen as strictly a male-dominated activity. Then women started to smoke as well once feminism took off as a major social force. At the time, a woman having the right to smoke in public was a real feminist issue. Our society once upon a time ago looked down upon that suggestion. Then, things changed and both genders were given the “right” to light up a cigarette (now, ironically, smoking is looked down upon not for reasons based on gender, but health).

Perhaps it might be fair to say that female bodybuilders are part of an “alternate femininity.” They’re still feminine, but not in a traditional sense.

One could argue the decision of a woman to take up the sport of bodybuilding is unto itself a feminist act. It’s an act of a woman defying social expectations to achieve results that are both self-empowering and openly defiant of the “weaker sex” label. While many real life FBBs may not actively consider themselves “feminists,” no one can argue that the sport by itself creates problems in how we define traditional femininity.

A lovely pose by Alana Shipp.
A lovely pose by Alana Shipp.

But not “alternate femininity.” The sport of female bodybuilding doesn’t contradict gender roles; it makes it more inclusive of other roles. Men are not the only ones allowed to be physically strong. Women can too. This doesn’t violate the gender divide, rather it challenges us to reconsider whether a divide really exists in the first place (or should exist). Thus, gender roles can’t be contradicted if there is nothing at all to contradict.

The “alternate femininity” theory is based on the idea that if gender is a social construct, everyone is allowed to define gender in their own way. How can you be wrong in your own personal opinion?

So, we can now define “feminine” (and its counterpart “masculine”) in a new way:

Feminine is anything a woman is or does.

This definition completely eliminates the factors of social expectations and cultural rituals. Feminine is not defined as anything a woman is or does as defined by society, but instead anything a woman is or does PERIOD.

For example, if a particular woman likes to drink beer, watch football and play violent videogames, all these activities are “feminine” simply because a woman is doing it. It doesn’t matter that most of us associate these activities with the male species. What matters is what happens on an individual level, nothing more and nothing less.

Who wouldn't go gaga over Sofia Vergara?
Who wouldn’t go gaga over Sofia Vergara?

When we view the world of female bodybuilding through this lens, then theoretically we shouldn’t have any issues here. If a woman wants to bulk herself up, she has every right to. But not only does she have the right to do this, she isn’t betraying her sex, her femininity or her relationship with masculinity. A female bodybuilder isn’t seeking to become masculine. She’s still feminine. Just a different kind of feminine.

It begs to be mentioned that “separate but equal” is not what this is about. “Alternate femininity” is not a separate kind of femininity, but rather a substitute for how we commonly define as conventional femininity.

Alright. So…what’s really the point of all this nonsense?

The main purpose of this conversation is to prove the point that there’s nothing really unusual about straight men being attracted to muscular women. While on the surface this does indeed seem strange, when you logically play out this scenario from beginning to end, this is really much ado about nothing.

Straight men are attracted to women. This simple fact has been accepted for generations upon generations. But if we add the condition of “straight men are attracted to muscular women,” why does everyone suddenly become irrational and think this is some kind of abomination?

I want to be poolside by Simone Sousa!
I want to be poolside by Simone Sousa!

If one of your male buddies told you while you were hanging out over drinks that he thinks “Sofia Vergara is hot,” well, I can’t think of too many guys who would disagree. So why is it considered weird when that same guy also says “Alina Popa is hot”? It’s a matter of personal preference, not some arbitrary set of hard-and-fast rules about what kinds of women men are allowed to be attracted to.

This dispels the rumor that we love female bodybuilders because “they look like men” or that “we’re secretly gay.” This cannot be further from the truth. Our sexuality is not in question. When I fantasize about being with a woman like Amber DeLuca, I’m not thinking about her as one of my guy friends. I don’t daydream about downing cheap lagers with her while we shoot pool or go bowling. Instead, I’m imagining a scenario involving a romantic candlelit dinner, expensive red wine, flowers, an idyllic beach-side resort and hours and hours of very hot and sensual lovemaking.

Oh yeah!

I want to connect with her emotionally and intellectually, not just physically. My romantic fantasies involving an FBB would not seem out of place in a sappy Nicholas Sparks novel. Just the amount of weight the leading lady can bench press might differ a tad!

To summarize, let’s attempt to reduce this discussion to its most basic elements:

Men are attracted to beautiful women.

Sound crazy? Nope. Sounds pretty reasonable to me. As a straight guy myself, I can attest to how accurate this sentence is. Men are attracted to beautiful women. Who can possibly argue with that?

The caveat, of course, is that men define “beautiful” in different ways. And guess what? They have every right to! No man should ever constrict himself over what kinds of beauty he appreciates in the world. Life is too short to limit yourself. Never box yourself in. If there’s something in life that really gets your gears running, don’t shy away from it. Embrace it!

Aaaaaaaand finally, a much-anticipated photo of Adriana Lima.
Aaaaaaaand finally, a much-anticipated photo of Adriana Lima.

I am attracted to women like Lisa Cross and Lindsay Mulinazzi not just because of their muscles. You see, it’s not just about the muscles, or her strength, or her bulk. It’s everything about her. Their personalities. Their intellect. Their drive, dedication, motivation and desires. It’s the total package that makes me go gaga for them.

Simply put, I’m attracted to Miss Cross and Miss Mulinazzi because they’re beautiful women.

Denise Masino is a beautiful woman.

Gayle Moher is a beautiful woman.

Victoria Dominguez is a beautiful woman.

Iris Kyle is a beautiful woman.

Kate Upton is a beautiful woman.

Halle Berry is a beautiful woman.

Katy Perry is a beautiful woman.

They are all beautiful women. The only difference is how universally regarded their beauty is. It’s as simple as that. Most of us can agree that Bar Refaeli is super gorgeous. But not everyone can agree that Monica Martin is equally gorgeous. But the truth is that both opinions are correct. Who is to say that they’re wrong? To each his own, right?

Too often, when we discuss the subject of female bodybuilders and the men who love them, we get way too caught up in talking about an FBB’s muscles. Yes, her muscles are very important, but that misses the mark. To reiterate a previous point, it’s not just about her muscles. Her muscles are just part of why many men are attracted to her. Her muscles are not the “be-all and end-all” of her beauty. They are part of a larger package.

And what package is that? Simple. She’s a woman.

A woman. That’s right. A woman. A very beautiful (and muscular) woman, but a woman nevertheless.

Adriana Lima and Alina Popa are both gorgeous; no if, ands, or buts about it. They just are. No need to explain why. No need to put either of them in a separate category of gorgeousness. No need to justify Miss Popa’s beauty compared to Miss Lima’s. Nope. Both are stunning. End of story.

The “alternate femininity” theory of female bodybuilders really boils down to the simple idea that men are attracted to them because they’re women. We find them beautiful. We love their femininity. Granted, we may define “femininity” differently from the general population, but the essential idea remains the same:

Men are attracted to beautiful women.

This core concept is at the heart of why men like me and countless others love female bodybuilders. We find them beautiful. There’s no way I can reduce this argument any further. It is what it is.

Is there any ambiguity left?